Category Archives: screenshots

Why use Auto Layout in Xcode for your localized apps

Auto Layout saves the día

As a developer, you may have some legitimate reasons not to use Auto Layout. You may even think that Auto Layout is Apple’s version of punching you in the gut. You may think it’s only about varying screen sizes. Mostly, maybe. But if the myriad screen sizes of iOS devices haven’t persuaded you, maybe internationalization will be the straw that broke the camel’s back. Auto Layout is downright essential for app localization and internationalization as well.

Turning on Auto Layout in Xcode

Turning on Auto Layout in Xcode

The best defense of this localization unpredictability is Auto Layout. Let Xcode help flow the text as it should, because you can’t expect to anticipate what the Russian or Arabic text is going to do. Auto Layout also makes it possible to have one set of .storyboard and .xib files for all the languages of your app. That’s a plus, right?

Don’t just take it from me. This is what Apple writes about Auto layout and internationalization in its Auto Layout guide. As a localizer myself, I will tell you it’s all true (except the part about Japanese, which is often way longer than the English):

Internationalization has three main effects on layout. First, when you translate your user interface into a different language, the labels require a different amount of space. German, for example, typically requires considerably more space than English. Japanese frequently requires much less. Second, the format used to represent dates and numbers can change from region to region, even if the language does not change. …Third, changing the language can affect not just the size of the text, but the organization of the layout as well. Different languages use different layout directions. English, for example, uses a left-to-right layout direction, and Arabic and Hebrew use a right-to-left layout direction.

In other words, localizing into other languages is going to change the layout of the text in your app in ways you haven’t considered. And ways you probably shouldn’t have to care about — that’s what Auto Layout does for you!

What’s a localized app look like without Auto Layout? It’s sort of like Apple introducing a new mini-iPhone screen size and your app suddenly looks terrible on it.

Tips for using Auto Layout when localizing apps

  1. Remove all fixed-width constraints. If the German text is 30% longer, and you don’t provide room for it in your UI, this will at least let iOS change the font size to accommodate. Otherwise, your localized text will get cropped.
  2. Text fields should fit to contents. Select Editor > Size To Fit Content so that text fields and labels resize automatically for longer or shorter text.
  3. Pin views to adjacent views. This way, when one view resizes to fit your localized text, the other views will too. Otherwise, views may overlap in some languages
  4. No minimums or maximums. Allow each content view to adjust in size as the language changes.
  5. Use leading and trailing attributes instead of left and right. This tip will make right-to-left languages (Arabic, Hebrew) flow properly.

That’s it! With just a few tips you’re localized apps will look awesome.

What if my text is STILL too long?

I’m not going to lie. Auto Layout is not a panacea that solves all the world’s internationalization ills. But you’re working with Babble-on, the localization pros, right? When you’ve given as much room as you can in your UI and Auto Layout has tried its best, the only remaining option is to change the text itself. That’s why we offer a free QA service for our localization clients where you can upload your localized screenshots. Anything that doesn’t fit or doesn’t look right we’ll shorten or alter the text to make it work.

Localized screenshots upload at Babble-on

Check it out for yourself by entering out developer portal! (It’s free and has great tools for localization.)